Newsletter: Volume 3, Issue 2

At Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, we continue to honor the legacy of President Roosevelt and his vision for a world based on four essential human freedoms. This year, we dedicate ourselves to celebrating the first pillar of President Roosevelt’s four freedoms: freedom of speech and expression. This essential human right forms the foundation of our democracy. As our event season begins, we look forward to fostering civic engagement through a slate of programs emphasizing the importance of free speech.

Newsletter Volume 3, Issue 1

Newsletter Volume 3, Issue 1

Seventy-six years ago today on the precipice of the United States' entry to the Second World War, Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered his eighth State of the Union address. In that speech, he shared his vision for a better world, a vision founded by interconnected human rights: the freedoms of religion and speech and from want and fear.

FDR’s Four Freedoms Speech: A Call for Human Rights “Everywhere in the World”

Not long past noon on Monday, January 6, 1941, Franklin D. Roosevelt locked his leg braces into place and mounted the podium of the Capitol’s House of Representatives to deliver his eighth State of the Union address. Newly elected to a third term, FDR was by now a seasoned leader. Indeed, on that winter day in 1941, he was arguably the most experienced and most important statesman in the world....

“A Date Which Will Live in Infamy”

“A Date Which Will Live in Infamy”

Seventy-five years ago on December 7, 1941, Japanese forces mounted a surprise military attack against the United States at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.  On December 8, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered a speech now known as the "Day of Infamy" speech, asking Congress to enter the Second World War. An excerpt from fdr4freedoms.org describes the attack and its aftermath.